• English

    djohnsonimage      
    Daniel Johnson
    (860) 859-1900 X920
    Humanities Department Chair;
    History and English Teacher
    Central Connecticut University - B.S. 
    Wesleyan University M.A.
    djohnson@stmct.org


    Gerkin      
    Jonathan Gerkin
    (860) 859-1900 X946
    Wheaton College - B.A.
    jgerkin@stmct.org

     Lindgren      
     
    Josh Lindgren
    (860) 859-1900 vm X923
    University of Connecticut, Storrs - B.S.
    jlindgren@stmct.org
     

    Anderson

     

     

    Ernest Anderson
    (860)859-1900 x115
    Nichols College - B.A.
    eanderson@stmct.org


     

    Language Arts

    This course is designed as a supplementary English course for 8th and 9th grade students, mainstreamed ESL students, and others who can benefit from the enrichment of an additional high school level English course.  The history of the English language will receive special attention.  Drama and narrative poetry will be used as models for writing.  The standard conventions of grammar and mechanics will be taught, both through the use of a traditional grammar text, and as an integral part of the revision stage of the writing process.  

    Introduction to Literature

    Introduction to Literature will provide students with a diverse experience of high school literature and the use of higher level of critical thinking. Students will analyze the common bonds between great literary works as well as their connection to history and culture. Thus, this class will sometimes share a topic or time period with Global Studies. We will be reading novels, short stories, poems, essays, and plays from a range of cultures and time periods. Students will learn to annotate their readings as well as intensify the level of their critical thinking and its expression through collaborative writing exercises. In order to help students utilize their newfound thinking skills, the course will feature a strong focus on writing and the proper process necessary to use in developing a strong and clear written argument. We will have several writing workshops that utilize the innovation of Google drive to allow teachers to see changes in student work immediately. All students will frequently practice brainstorming, outlining, and drafting papers. Discussion is necessary in the advanced literature courses students will encounter later in high school, and thus classroom participation is essential to every student’s development and end of term evaluation.

    American Literature

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to the diverse genres of American literature in preparation for future academic and professional endeavors.  From early Native American writings through contemporary text, this survey course provides students with the opportunity to experience a variety of literary expressions. Students will develop critical thinking skills as they learn to analyze literary works and connect them to their personal experiences. While being made aware of the ever-changing future, students will enhance their higher order thinking skills by utilizing technology for their research process to better prepare them for the professional world. Beyond individual reading and writing assignments, presentations and collaborative projects are emphasized to allow opportunities for team building and learning how to accomplish a task alongside other diverse learners.

    British Literature

    British Literature is a senior level literature course focused on developing reading and writing skills through the study of both British literature and novels from around the English-speaking world. The course goals include development of the writing and critical thinking skills necessary for succeeding in most college and adult career pursuits. Special focus will also be given to completing the college process. This process is aided by several interview-style sessions between teacher and student intended to create and perfect the college essay. In addition, the course takes advantage of educational innovations like Google documents, which allows teachers to provide students with live feedback during collaborative writing workshops. All students will frequently practice brainstorming, outlining, and drafting papers. Furthermore, classroom discussion is necessary in order to encourage the skills needed for the advanced courses that the students will encounter in college. Global LiteratureStudents will critically engage in several genres of literature including: novels, drama, short story, creative nonfiction, and poetry.  This course concentrates on reading, writing, speaking, listening and observational analysis.  The writing process is an important focus with emphasis on meaning, voice and power.  Writing skills are developed using the writing process in various creative, critical, and personal response assignments.  Vocabulary and grammar are integrated contextually into the readings.

    Academic Writing

    This course uses google drive as an innovative learning tool. Academic writing is a new course intended to help seniors and postgraduates prepare for the rigors of college writing assignments. During the first quarter, students will be reading and writing a variety of essays across genres in order to increase their understanding of academic writing; meanwhile, students will be reviewing proper grammar and how to write complex, college level sentences. During the second and third quarters, students will be writing weekly essays in their google portfolios with constantly varying topics, styles, and points of view. While the focus of the second quarter’s writing development will be on proper organization, the third quarter will focus on developing argumentation skills and personal style. Course writing will be done in collaborative writing workshops using google drive. The teacher will be able to see live edits to student work and make immediate suggestions and edits. Finally, the fourth quarter will use the newly developed formal language and writing skills in order to develop student rhetoric, presentation, and public speaking skills.

    Transitions to Literature

    Transitions to Literature is a literature and composition class that draws from a variety of world authors to facilitate the learning of more critical reading and more structured writing.  Students use a host of anthologized short stories, poems, essays, and plays in combination with novels to develop self-disciplined and analytical reading skills, stronger vocabulary, and a writing process that focuses on the revision of both creative and analytical compositions. This literature-based course is designed to give the high school student the challenge of a college literature course.  Representative pieces of literature are examined as unique reflections of the human experience in order to understand historical and contemporary issues. The main themes covered in this course are: The American Dream; Racism and Colonialism; The Possibility of Good and the Problem of Evil; Men and Women; and the Individual in Civilization.  In the fall term, the course also emphasizes preparation for college entrance examinations. In the spring semester, the emphasis shifts to preparing students to meet college level writing assignments.  

    Global Literature

    Students will critically engage in several genres of literature including: novels, drama, short story, creative nonfiction, and poetry. This course concentrates on reading, writing, speaking, listening and observational analysis. The writing process is an important focus with emphasis on meaning, voice, and power. Writing skills are developed using the writing process in various creative, critical, and personal response assignments. Vocabulary and grammar are integrated contextually into the readings.

    World Literature

    This literature-based course is designed to give the high school graduate the challenge of a college literature course. Representative pieces of literature are examined as unique reflections of the human experience in order to understand historical and contemporary issues. The main themes covered in this course are: The American Dream; Racism and Colonialism; The Possibility of Good and the Problem of Evil; Men and Women; and the Individual in Civilization. In the fall term, the course also emphasizes preparation for college entrance examinations. In the spring semester, the emphasis shifts to preparing students to meet college level writing assignments.

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